Drug Rehab for Women & Children

There are plans to start a new drug rehab in Salem, OR.  The program will be for women and will allow them to bring their children.  There is definitely a need for this.  These types of programs are few and far between. Sadly, women often lose custody of their children when entering drug rehab.

Treatment for drug addiction often tears families apart, sending children to foster care while mothers undergo court-ordered rehab.

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16 Responses to Drug Rehab for Women & Children

  1. Anonymous says:

    It is always exciting to see programs open that cater to specific demographics. Being that alcoholism and drug addiction is a family disease it makes perfect sense that a mother would be in treatment with her children.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I am a big supporter of programs like these. I feel that the children of alcoholics’ have been through a lot and placing them with their mothers while they are getting sober is a great idea. The children should be able to experience recovery too.

  3. Anonymous says:

    I am a mother myself and could not imagine being away from my children for any length of time, so I think this will be a wonderful opportunity. Not being or have been in the situation myself, will the main focus be interuppted?

  4. Anonymous says:

    I would be interested to see how the treatment program is organized. Meaning – are the women in treatment able to care for their children while also getting the help they desperately need? Also, how is the program organized for the children? Are they able to attend school while living in treatment with their mother? I agree that there is a real need for this type of program, but the organization of it would be crucial to its success, for both the mother and child.

  5. Anonymous says:

    I have seen many women who needed treatment not get it because of their children. I think this would be a great opportunity to help these women, as well as their children. Knowing how this disease affects the whole family, I think it would be great for the kids to be involved to some extent, and allow mothers to get the help they so desperately need.

  6. Anonymous says:

    Seeing young ladies get sober is one of the best things i have seen in recovery, having three sisters and knowing about 27 women in AA and there personal struggles it is great to hear that more treatments are opening the door for them

  7. Anonymous says:

    At the age of 14, I became a mother to my first son. Soon after he was born I went back to using crystal meth. I left him places, hardly saw him, and when I did see him I was dragging him with me to drug houses and many other places that any mother not in her addiction could not bear to see her child at. My parents finally came to me and said that if I did not give him to them that they were going to have to call child protective services on me. I knew that I did not want him growing up in a foster home, and or be adopted. So they took him, at this time it was great for me. I was able to do the things I wanted, when I wanted to and didn’t have to worry about him. Soon after, I started to not be able to see him, they wouldnt let me talk to him, and all ties were broken. My parents had watched me hurt him in so many ways that they refused for me to be around him, they didn’t want me to hurt him anymore. When I finally decided to go to treatment, we searched and searched for one that I was able to have him at, so that I could learn to be a mother and build a relationship with him. To our surprise there were few available. In the end I had to such it up and just go without him. I still learned how to live soberly, and how taking care of myself, truly caring about myself and others, and working a program daily will help me to raise my children. I now have a great relationship with him and seeing him today is the greatest gift I have. Starting a place for mothers and thier children is so meaningful to me. I understand the problems women go through not being able to have their children, so starting a place for them really hits home for me. I think it is so wonderful.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Most of my professional career has been working in residential treatment centers with newly recovering women and their children. I believe that women want to be good mothers, which can be a motivator for recovery. Getting clean and sober is a huge undertaking as is becoming a parent. A lot of us are unprepared for parenthood, but when coupled with addiction, the problem is greater. If the child is drug affected, this creates another challenge. Therefore, it is important that women are provided the support and resources addressing their special needs, such as learning how to live a clean and sober lifestyle, learning parenting skills and sometimes, learning how to parent a disabled child. With a career of drug addiction behind them, women also need to learn job skills and social skills. Long term residential centers provide the foundation for a recovering woman and her children. In my opinion, we need many more of them.

  9. Anonymous says:

    It takes time to recover from addiction. Separation from loved ones for a long period of time effects all parties involved especially the young ones. Recovery for me is a lifestyle and with so much change it was important for me to learn how to live and raise my children in a healthy environment. I was fortunate to have a strong foundation of love with my family who were committed to taking care of me. My family supported me the best they could however to be around people with similar issues as mine, who truly understand me and the way I think, was an asset to my recovery. I have had the opportunity to work with people who were born and raised in addiction and now face parenthood themselves. The opening of facilities such is this is well needed in the world today.

  10. Anonymous says:

    I was speaking with a young woman today, barely 18, 7 months pregnant, clean for the past 5 months and she thinks that she has really moved up in the world as her boyfriend, her child’s father, doesn’t hit her like boyfriends in the past have. Thing is, this young lady is clean because she is pregnant, she really wants to be a mom and to do the right thing for her child. Afraid to be alone and unsupported emotionally she stays with the man. Long term residential treatment for her and her child would provide her with the support and tools for living that she so desperately needs. Unfortunately there are far too few places….

  11. Anonymous says:

    Separation of women from their children has long been an issue in treatment and at times an excuse. Any way we can keep women and children together while affecting positive change; any way we can open possibilities to wellness needs to be a priority.

  12. Anonymous says:

    I’ve known many women who got sober for their children. This can be a huge motivator. Then as the program kicks in the ladies start doing for themselves as their lives and their children’s lives get better.

    Programs like these are important. Salvation Army also has programs for women with children http://www.salvationarmycares.org/ourFamilies.asp#19

  13. Anonymous says:

    Having worked extensively with young mother’s on an outpatient level, attendance due to lack of childcare contributed largely to a poor success rate. Many mother’s were court mandated to attend, but without having someone to properly care for their children, the law became a mute point, and a strong sense of hopelessness prevailed.Most young Mom’s were fairly negligent in their illness,to say the least in terms of their parenting skills. Trying to become a more responsible and loving parent with having to make a choice between going to treatment or staying with their children, often makes the idea of sobriety, just that, an idea. And something very difficult, if not impossible to attain. Hooray, for treatment with children!

  14. Anonymous says:

    Several years ago when my own daughter was in the pit of her addictions and legal issues, asked us for help with finding a recovery program that would allow her to still raise her young son. We were not aware of this program at the time but know that there are opportunities for women to get into recovery and raise their children at the same time. The biggest fear my daughter had was losing her son in the court system and wondering if he would remember who his mom is. This is progress in the treatment industry for the families who need help healing as a unity.

  15. Anonymous says:

    There are so many drug-addicted women with children in the world today. Unfortunately, these women are usually the only role models these children see. These children often grow up experimenting with drugs and alcohol at very early ages and more than often, end up following the footsteps of their mother. What a wonderful idea to offer a place where these women can come and recover, bringing with them the ones who often need just as much recovery. From experience with my family, i know that addiction affects the entire family. My parents and siblings are going through therapy and the recovery process just like me, healing in their own ways from the turmoil that arose in their lives as a result of my drug use. These children can experience healing in a safe environment, while watching their mothers grow and perservere through this disease. I’m surprised there arent many of these types of places already out there. After all, it is a family disease.

  16. LISA says:

    THE ONLY THING THAT IM READING IS HOW GREAT IT IS FOR THE MOM .MY DAUGHTER IS IN A FACILITY LIKE THIS AND HAS OUR GRANDSON WHO IS 11 YEARS OLD. THIS IS NOT A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT FOR HIM . HES WITNESSED ATTEMPTED SUICIDES, GOES TO A SCHOOL WHERE HE IS DAILY NAMED CALLED AND HARRASSED, DOES NOT RECIEVE COUNSOLING HIMSELF IN DEALING WHAT HE GOES THRU ,FEELS ALOT OF RESENTMENT TOWARDS HIS MOM FOR PUTTING HIM IN A POSITION LIKE THIS AND HE FEELS HE IS BEING PUNISHED FOR HER BAD CHOICES. SURE IT HELPS MOM BUT HAS THERE BEEN A STUDY ON THE EFFECTS THIS HAS ON THE OLDER CHILDREN ?

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